Soul Rebels (Receiver, 1970)

Soul Rebels presents Bob Marley & The Wailers at a transitional stage between their frenetic Studio One ska sound and their polished, popular Island roots sound.  As such, the style here is mid-tempo early reggae/rock steady, featuring a gritty sound controlled by producer Lee "Scratch" Perry.  Fans will recognize early (and rougher) versions of the popular Peter Tosh-led tracks "400 Years" and "No Sympathy," as well as the classic "Soul Rebel," later covered by acts like Inner Circle.  Largely, however, these are not the most recognizable Wailers songs -- which is good in terms of avoiding a stale, "been there done that" stigma, but bad in terms of the fact that there may be a reason why these aren't particularly well-known tunes.  They're not bad, of course, but there's not much that overwhelms.  Nonetheless, "Rebels Hop" is energetic fun, "It's Alright" is a funky, soul-drenched jam, while the best track besides "Soul Rebel" might be the swaying, organ-filled gem "Reaction."  Soul Rebels is a bit uneven, but shouldn't disappoint those who can't get enough Marley, particularly if you'd like to delve more into his early pre-Island days.

Track Listing
1. Soul Rebel 
2. Try Me 
3. It's Alright 
4. No Sympathy 
5. My Cup 
6. Soul Almighty 
7. Rebel's Hop 
8. Corner Stone 
9. 400 Years 
10. No Water
11. Reaction 
12. My Sympathy 
Soul Rebels
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Burnin' (Island, 1973)

Even the novice reggae listener knows Bob Marley's songs, right?  Well, actually, I've met some people who don't -- and a couple who don't even know who he is.  Well, in case you don't know, he is the number one superstar of reggae, even now, decades after his death.  I don't have a lot of his albums, just because I've heard his songs so many times that I'm actually a bit tired of them.  Of course, that doesn't mean that I don't like his music -- indeed, who doesn't.  His music is so great that you come to take the greatness for granted.  That said, Burnin' is one of Bob Marley's earlier albums, when he and his band were still known as simply "The Wailers."  Several of the tracks here -- "Put It On," "Duppy Conqueror," and "Small "Axe" -- are remakes of songs The Wailers recorded earlier with producer Lee "Scratch" Perry, here redone with more clarity.  The genius of Marley is shown in the surprisingly uptempo, funky "I Shot the Sheriff" (I say "surprisingly" because you tend to remember songs differently than they actually sound, this one in particular, since it has been remade so many times -- most successfully by Eric Clapton.).  Many other Bob Marley & The Wailers staples are here, including "Get Up, Stand Up," "Burnin' and Lootin'," and the aforementioned "Small Axe," "Put It On."  All of these hits were written or co-written by Marley, displaying his amazing musical skills.  Indeed, it is the tracks not written by him -- "Hallelujah Time,"  "One Foundation," and "Rasta Man Chant" -- that are the weaker links in this album, leaving little doubt why he became the focal point of the group that would switch from "The Wailers" to "Bob Marley & The Wailers."

Track Listing
1. Get Up, Stand Up
2. Hallelujah Time
3. I Shot the Sheriff
4. Burnin' and Lootin'
5. Put It On
6. Small Axe
7. Pass It On
8. Duppy Conqueror
9. One Foundation
10. Rasta Man Chant

Burnin'

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Natty Dread (Island, 1974)

You can tell the stage of Bob Marley's career at which he recorded an album by the length of his hair.  As such, Natty Dread is still a relatively early set, but it produces some seminal tracks.  The first 3 in particular -- the slow, funky "Lively Up Yourself" with its classic bass line, the mellow organ-filled "No Woman, No Cry," and "Them Belly Full (But We Hungry)" -- carry Natty Dread.  The remaining songs are fairly standard fare, with "Rebel Music (3 O'Clock Road Block)" being the best.  And personally, I wouldn't necessarily rank any of these 3 in my top 10 favorite Marley cuts.  The album as a whole has a slow, mournful tone that is, well, a bit depressing, and absent are a lot of the strong melodies that drive the Wailers' best songs.  It's hard not to let the mystique of Marley affect your opinion, but if I didn't know who this was singing, I'd say that it sounds like a fairly average reggae album.

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Track Listing
1. Lively Up Yourself
2. No Woman, No Cry
3. Them Belly Full (But We Hungry)
4. Rebel Music (3 O'Clock Road Block)
5. So Jah Seh
6. Natty Dread
7. Bend Down Low
8. Talkin' Blues
9. Revolution

Natty Dread

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Kaya (Island, 1978)

Kaya is one of my favorite of Bob Marley's albums, even though many critics and fans don't care for it as much as others. Some of the tracks on it are remakes of his earlier works, but I don't care; they are just plain great songs.  Actually, compared to the originals, songs like "Sun Is Shining" and the title cut are crisper and clearer, allowing the musicality to shine through.  Every song here is good, most are excellent, and some are absolutely classic -- my personal favorites being "Is This Love," "Misty Morning," and the ultra-funky "Sun Is Shining."


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Track Listing
1. Easy Skanking
2. Kaya
3. Is This Love
4. Sun Is Shining
5. Satisfy My Soul
6. She's Gone
7. Misty Morning
8. Crisis
9. Running Away
10. Time Will Tell

Kaya

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Uprising (Island, 1980)

Possibly Bob Marley's most consistent album, this effort shows that even as he got older, he was as strong as ever (artistically if not physically).  Uprising represents just pure quality roots reggae, and as on Kaya, every doggone song here is good.  It would be useless to go through them all, but my favorites are the funky, militant "We and Dem," and the mellow "Pimper's Paradise," whose evocative lyrics linger long after the song is over.  Also great are the emotional vocals of "Work," the poignant message of "Bad Card," and the classic uptempo fun of "Could You Be Loved."

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Track Listing
1. Coming in From the Cold
2. Real Situation
3. Bad Card
4. We and Dem
5. Work
6. Zion Train
7. Pimper's Paradise
8. Could You Be Loved
9. Forever Loving Jah
10. Redemption Song

Uprising

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 Legend (Island, 1984)

Um, is there really anything to say about this Bob Marley and The Wailers greatest hits album, which is still popular, gaining new fans with each generation?  Having sold over 12 million copies, this is the most popular reggae album of all time.  It actually doesn't contain some of my personal favorites, like "Sun Is Shining," "Pimper's Paradise," "We and Dem," and "Misty Morning," but that's just petty, isn't it?

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Track Listing
1. Is This Love
2. No Woman No Cry
3. Could You Be Loved
4. Three Little Birds
5. Buffalo Soldier
6. Get Up Stand Up
7. Stir It Up
8. On Love/People Get Ready
9. I Shot the Sheriff
10. Waiting in Vain
11. Redemption Song
12. Satisfy My Soul
13. Exodus
14. Jamming

Legend

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 Natural Mystic (Island, 1995)

I guess this is supposed to be a sort of Legend Part II (The cover states, "The LEGEND lives on."), but that is a darn hard standard to live up to.   Obviously, Natural Mystic isn't as great as Legend, but it is very good in its own right; after all, Bob Marley certainly made enough good material for a few "best of" compilations.  A couple of my favorites that were conspicuously absent from Legend are thankfully included here: the sho' nuff funky "Sun Is Shining" and the morality tale "Pimpers Paradise."  Other well-known tracks not on Legend are welcome additions: "Time Will Tell," "Natural Mystic," "Easy Skanking," and "Trenchtown Rock."   The Wailers' rendition of Curtis Mayfield's "Keep On Moving" is also popular, but I never have cared for it very much.  The cut, however, that makes the album is the hard-to-find "Iron Lion Zion," an electric, celebratory jam that is refreshingly unfamiliar (unlike many Marley tunes).  "Crazy Baldheads" and "So Much Trouble in the World" are also very nice songs that haven't worn thin (yet) due to overexposure, although both have been successfully remade recently, the latter by Marley's son Damian.

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Track Listing
1. Natural Mystic
2. Easy Skanking
3. Iron Lion Zion
4. Crazy Baldheads
5. So Much Trouble in the World
6. War
7. Africa Unite
8. Trenchtown Rock [Live]
9. Keep On Moving
10. Sun Is Shining
11. Who the Cap Fit
12. One Drop
13. Roots, Rock, Reggae
14. Pimpers Paradise
15. Time Will Tell

Natural Mystic

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Dreams of Freedom: Ambient Translations of Bob Marley in Dub (Island, 1997)

Ambient is one of the many modern styles of music that owes a great part of its formation to reggae (dub, to be specific), although you wouldn't necessarily know it by listening to this spacious, minimalist form of electonica.  Dreams of Freedom returns ambient to its roots by remixing and re-interpreting the works of none other than Bob Marley himself.  A daunting task to say the least, this undertaking was helmed by electronica producer/remixer extraordinaire Bill Laswell -- perhaps the only person who could pull off such a melding of styles.  I was a bit apprehensive about what this album would sound like, but I was pleasantly surprised to hear thatn Dreams fo Freedom remains at its core a reggae album.  The ambient embellishments -- the echoes and fades, the nature sound effects (birds chirping, water running, etc.), the lengthy build-ups of minimal music ("The Heathen," for example, takes 2 minutes to start up), the lethargic pace -- serve as secondary enhancements to the reggae riddims.  At worst, some tunes border on sounding like "muzak" versions of Bob Marley songs, but the best tracks -- "Rebel Music," "Exodus," "Is This Love," "So Much Trouble in the World," "Burnin' and Lootin'" -- shine a new light on the brilliance of Marley's material (as any good remake should do).  Some purists may poo-poo the idea of ambient re-workings of such classic tunes, but it actually helps that the tunes are familiar; otherwise, non-ambient fans might lose their patience at times with this plodding sound.  Perhaps I'm a bit biased -- since this album played a significant role in my honeymoon -- but I think that for the most part, Dreams of Freedom works.  The dreamy, floating sound is atmospheric to the utmost degree and, while not necessarily suitable for everyday listening, it can really set the mood for a relaxing day on the beach or a passionate night in the sack. [cue '70s porn music here]  

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Track Listing
1. Rebel Music (3 O'Clock Roadblock)
2. No Woman, No Cry
3. The Heathen
4. Them Belly Full (But We Hungry)
5. Waiting in Vain
6. So Much Trouble in the World
7. Exodus
8. Burnin' and Lootin'
9. Is This Love
10. One Love/People Get Ready
11. Midnight Ravers
Dreams of Freedom
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Bob Marley Vs. Lee Scratch Perry: The Best of the Upsetter Years 1970-1971 (Cult, 1999)

This is an intriguing look into the middle stage of The Wailers' career (before Island and after Studio One), when they were paired, in a mind-boggling collection of talent, with super producer Lee "Scratch" Perry.  You get to hear early versions of songs Bob Marley & Co. would later re-record to international success -- such as "Small Axe," "Sun Is Shining," "Lively Up Yourself," "Kaya," "Duppy Conqueror," and "Trench Town Rock" -- alongside some lesser-known cuts, like "It's Alright," "My Cup," and "Try Me."  To truly enjoy these tracks, you have to overcome the sub-par, muffled sound quality.  I realize that '70s Lee Perry productions have a raw sound, but this inferior quality is a bit too raw for my taste.  Even if the sound quality were better, I'd still prefer the updated versions of these songs to the rough, early reggae sound.  Yes, the later remakes of songs like "Kaya" and "Sun Is Shining" have a bit more of a popular, crossover sound, but they're also crisper and more refined, allowing the full power of the vocals and music to shine.  Of course, though, you can't deny the greatness of the songwriting on this album, which includes a couple of tracks not sung or written by Marley but by a pair of ex-Wailers: Peter Tosh's "400 Years" and Bunny Wailer's classic "Dreamland."  Odds are, if you haven't heard these old versions, you'll like whichever song's updated version you like the best.  If you already have the group's African Herbsman album, though, I don't know if this collection is worth buying, since 12 of the 18 tracks here are from that classic set -- displaying a disappointing lack of depth of research by the compilers of Bob Marley Vs. Lee Scratch Perry.

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Track Listing
1. Mr. Brown
2. Soul Rebel
3. Fussing and Fighting
4. Sun Is Shining
5. Duppy Conquerer
6. Small Axe
7. African Herbsman
8. Kaya
9. Dreamland featuring Bunny Wailer
10. It's Alright
11. My Cup
12. Put It On
13. Keep On Moving
14. 400 Years featuring Peter Tosh
15. Try Me
16. Stand Alone
17. Lively Up Yourself
18. Trench Town Rock

Vs Lee Scratch Perry

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Greatest Hits at Studio One (Heartbeat, 2003)

There's no doubt that Bob Marley is the reggae icon.  You can't escape images of him and his long dreadlocks, straggly beard, and Rastafarian trappings.  Even non-reggae fans know his songs -- from "No Woman, No Cry" to "One Love" to "I Shot the Sheriff" -- but few in the mainstream may realize that many of the songs released on his popular Island albums were remakes of his earlier works, produced by legends like Lee "Scratch" Perry at the Black Ark Stuido in the '70s and Clement "Coxsone" Dodd at Studio One in the '60s (He did so at the suggestion of Island's Chris Blackwell so that Marley could make a decent cut of the profits.).  Few people get to see or hear The Wailers in their Studio One phase -- clean cut, clean shaven, suit and tie, polished shoes, crooning up-tempo ska and rock steady tunes and slow, pleading R&B ballads -- but Heartbeat has gone a long way to remedying this over the years by releasing compilations like Simmer Down at Studio One, Wailing Wailers at Studio One, Rare Ska Sides From Studio One, and now, Greatest Hits at Studio One.  As the title suggests, Heartbeat has gone through the nearly 100 songs The Wailers recorded at Studio One between 1964 and 1966 and culled the biggest, most popular and influential hits, providing valuable exposure to this exciting, formative time in their career.  Listening to this album is like taking a peek into the past, knowing as we do the vastness of popularity and success that lay around the corner for the group.  Fans of the Island-era Wailers should be pleased to find on Greatest Hits early versions of Marley's "One Love," "Put It On," and "Cry to Me," as well as Peter Tosh's "Maga Dog" and "Sinner Man" (AKA "Downpressor Man") and Bunny Wailer's "Dreamland" and "Who Feels It Knows It" (later covered by Rita Marley).  Even if you're not big into the fast-paced ska/rock steady sound (like me, admittedly), this familiarity will undoubtedly prove intriguing enough to draw you in, easing your appreciation of the lesser-known (although still quite popular in Jamaica in their day) tracks like the Tosh-led "Treat Me Good," Bunny Wailer's "Let Him Go," and the doo-wop ballad "I'm Still Waiting," which shows how Marley's songwriting and performing talent transcended genres.  As an added bonus, the liner notes are expertly written with fascinating information and insider details on each song.  Undoubtedly, you are already familiar with with Bob Marley & The Wailers' later work, but if you're a big fan, you might want to give their Studio One era work a listen to get the full picture.

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Track Listing
1. One Love
2. I'm Gonna Put It On
3. Simmer Down
4. Treat Me Good
5. Who Feels It Knows It
6. Cry to Me
7. It Hurts to Be Alone
8. Dreamland
9. Let Him Go
10. Sinner Man
11. Jailhouse
12. Love and Affection
13. Maga Dog
14. I Am Going Home
15. I Need You So
16. I'm Still Waiting
17. And I Love Her
18. Sunday Morning
Greatest Hits at Studio One
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African Herbsman (Trojan, 2003 [orig. released 1973])

Generally, when people think of Wailers albums, they think of the Island releases that propelled them into international stardom, but African Herbsman, released pre-Island on the Trojan label, is certainly one of their classics, containing early, Lee Perry-produced versions of seminal tunes they would later re-record for Island, such as "Kaya," "Sun Is Shining," "Satisfy My Soul" (here titled "Don't Rock the Boat"), "Duppy Conqueror," and "Small Axe."  African Herbsman is so chock-full of classics, you'd think it was a compilation put together after the fact.  Actually, this 2003 re-release does contain extra tracks -- 10 to be exact, bolstering the set into an awesome (if somewhat tiring) 26-track journey -- but the added songs don't really add much value for the average fan.  For the most part, they are instrumental "versions" of some of the other tracks ("Small Axe," "Duppy Conqueror," "Trenchtown Rock," "Lively Up Yourself," etc.) or DJ toasts, which, though intriguing, are more for diehard fans -- similar in appeal to Perry's Arkology box set.  For most listeners, the original 16 tracks will be plenty, highlighted by "Duppy Conqueror," "Small Axe," "Trenchtown Rock," "Kaya," "Sun Is Shining," and the often overlooked "Stand Alone."  As would be expected, the sound on African Herbsman is more raw than on the Island remakes; which is better is debatable. (I prefer the cleaner sound, although certain cuts here, like the edgy, stark "Sun Is Shining," could shed a refreshing new light on songs to those listeners who are used to the Island versions.).  

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Track Listing
1. Lively Up Yourself
2. Small Axe
3. Duppy Conqueror
4. Trenchtown Rock
5. African Herbsman
6. Keep On Moving 
7. Fussing and Fighting
8. Stand Alone
9. All In One [Medley, Part 1]
10. Don't Rock The Boat 
11. Put It On 
12. Sun Is Shining
13. Kaya 
14. Riding High
15. Brain Washing 
16. Four Hundred Years
17. Memphis -- The Upsetters
18. Live [Lively Up Yourself Version] 
19. More Axe
20. The Axe Man [Small Axe Version] -- The Upsetters
21. Zig Zag [Duppy Conqueror Version] -- The Upsetters
22. Grooving Kingston 12 [Trench Town Rock]
23. Moving Version -- Big Youth
24. Keep On Skanking 
25. Copasetic [All in One Version] -- The Upsetters
26. Kaya Version 2
African Herbsman
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Africa Unite: The Singles Collection (Island, 2005)

You'd think there'd be little to gain from yet another Bob Marley retrospective, but Africa Unite seems to have something fairly unique to offer by focusing on official singles -- and not just those on the Island label, but also his JAD releases.  Of course, it isn't a comprehensive collection (especially since it doesn't contain anything recorded before 1970), but it contains his best-known songs -- meaning it's more for newbies than for the hardcore Marley set.  Still, diehards should take note that Africa Unite unearths a brand new Marley tune, "Slogans," which was found as a bare-bones recording done in Marley's Miami hotel room in 1979.  Stephen Marley and a host of other musicians (most notably Eric Clapton) recorded over the track with steady hands that craft a solid, if not classic, throwback to the '70s roots heyday.  Presumably to offer more than just one new track, though, the album also features two new remixes of Marley songs.  The first is "Africa Unite," remixed by will.i.am of Black Eyed Peas fame.  Musically, the mix is surprisingly restrained and true to the original, but will.i.am feels obliged to chip in vocals as well, which, while not of the cheesy "my hump my humps" variety, still prove distracting.  The other new mix, "Stand Up Jamrock," is of the "mash up" variety, combining "Get Up, Stand Up" with Damian Marley's hit "Welcome to Jamrock."  It leans heavily toward the original Marley track, lending a dark, ominous sound that, like the other two new tunes, is decent, but not necessarily worth the price of a new album.

Track Listing
1. Soul Rebel
2. Lively Up Yourself 
3. Trench Town Rock 
4. Concrete Jungle 
5. I Shot the Sheriff 
6. Get Up, Stand Up 
7. No Woman, No Cry [Live]
8. Roots, Rock, Reggae
9. Exodus 
10. Waiting in Vain 
11. Jammin' 
12. Is This Love
13. Sun Is Shining 
14. Could You Be Loved 
15. Three Little Birds 
16. Buffalo Soldier 
17. One Love / People Get Ready 
18. Africa Unite [will.i.am Remix]
19. Slogans 
20. Stand Up Jamrock [Ashley Beedle Remix]
Africa Unite
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One Love at Studio One: 1964-1966 (Heartbeat, 2006)

Heartbeat continues their string of Studio One re-releases with one of the earliest retrospectives of the Wailers' years at the legendary Studio One. I can't pretend that all of these songs are classics -- or even particularly good -- just because they're performed by Bob Marley, but with over 40 tracks (the original had "only" 34), there is plenty to enjoy, and even the lesser tunes provide some level of novelty (even if they don't provide repeat listening). "This Train," a melancholy acoustic guitar ballad featuring Bob and Bunny Wailer, is one of the most moving selections, and previously unreleased before One Love at Studio One was originally released. Its Christian overtones certainly make it a notable addition to the Wailers oeuvre. It's easy to see why the "Wages of Love Rehearsal" hadn't been released before (being a rehearsal and all), but its simple, plucky acoustic guitar sound adds a gritty edge missing from the soft, airy (yet still appealing) final take of the song. Another discovered song, "True Confession," is a fun yet indistinctive ska track. There are several alternate takes, and while I don't know if any of them really adds a whole lot to the other versions, early renditions of classics "I'm Gonna Put It On" (AKA "Put It On," later re-recorded by the group) and "Sinner Man" (later recorded by Peter Tosh) shine, as do the doo-wop ska of "Playboy" and the mellow "Rocking Steady." Those who know The Wailers only from their Island years may be shocked to find such a fast-paced ska sound littered with non-cultural, non-Rasta love songs, some of which are straightforward R&B ballads ("I Need You," "Where's the Girl for Me") and some of which feature the now-forgotten Junior Braithwaite on very youthful-sounding, yet well-sung lead ("Habits," "It Hurts to Be Alone"). Another eyebrow raiser is their cover of the rousing spiritual "Amen," led by Tosh, whose gruff, soulful voice makes it sound for all the world like a Toots & The Maytals song. The R&B ballads -- about 9 or 10 of 'em -- are where One Love at Studio One falters the most; too many of them are generic attempts to mimic the American sound of the time, and they just suck up the group's energy like a musical black hole. I suppose when you're searching for rare Wailers sides, though -- something Heartbeat does so well -- it's hard to toss anything away.

Track Listing
CD 1: 
1. This Train [previously unreleased] 
2. Simmer Down 
3. I Am Going Home 
4. Do You Remember 
5. Mr. Talkative 
6. Habits 
7. Amen 
8. Go Jimmy Go 
9. Teenager in Love 
10. I Need You [previously unreleased alternate take] 
11. It Hurts to Be Alone [previously unreleased alternate take] 
12. True Confession [previously unreleased] 
13. Lonesome Feelings 
14. There She Goes 
15. Diamond Baby 
16. Playboy [previously unreleased alternate take] 
17. Where's the Girl for Me 
18. Hooligan Ska [previously unreleased alternate take] 
19. One Love 
20. Love and Affection 
21. Tell Them Lord [bonus track] 

CD 2: 
1. And I Love Her 
2. Rude Boy 
3. I'm Still Waiting 
4. Ska Jerk 
5. Somewhere to Lay My Head 
6. Wages of Love Rehearsal [previously unreleased] 
7. Wages of Love 
8. I'm Gonna Put It On [previously unreleased alternate take] 
9. Cry to Me 
10. Jailhouse 
11. Sinner Man [previously unreleased alternate take] 
12. He Who Feels It Knows It 
13. Let Him Go 
14. When the Well Runs Dry 
15. Can't You See 
16. What Am I Supposed to Do 
17. Rolling Stone 
18. Bend Down Low 
19. Freedom Time 
20. Rocking Steady [previously unreleased alternate take]
One Love at Studio One
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